Old Franklin Township Historical Society

GENEALOGY RESEARCH HINTS

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The following article is taken from Columns a bimonthly publication of the Wisconsin Historical Society page 10

Worldwide Genealogical Resource
Available at the Society

HAVE YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO FIND your Italian ancestors in Boston or your Belgian relatives in Brussels but could not afford to travel?  Do you have too many ancestors in too many places?  Your genealogical research just got easier.In one place, the Wisconsin Historical Society offers access to its own unparalleled holdings, the microfilm holdings of the Genealogical Society of Utah (the largest genealogical collection in the world) and digital resources provided by the library edition of Ancestry and Footnote.com.  If you want one-stop research, come to the Wisconsin Historical Society.During the last 160 years, the Society built one of North America’s premier genealogical collections.  The library collection consists of published and microfilmed family histories, church and cemetery records, birth, death and marriage registrations, federal and state censuses, local histories, and military information covering the United States and Canada.  The Society's archives holds original land, court and military records useful to researchers studying Wisconsin families.Now researchers who visit the Society library may order microfilm from the vast collections of the Genealogical Society of Utah, the world's greatest collection of family history source materials.  German church records, land records from Ireland and military records from France as well as various records from Japan, India, Africa and other countries provide the connection to our forefathers' experiences.The Genealogical Society of Utah has been microfilming original records from around the world for almost 70 years.  They have filmed in more than 100 countries and amassed a wide variety of primary historical documents such as civil registration, church, probate, census, land, tax and military records.  The collection also contains numerous family and local histories.  With the Society’s cooperation, the GSU has been filming Wisconsin records since the 1970s.

Ten Tips for Starting Your Family History Research

 

1.                  Start at home.  Gather any records your family has collected.  Diaries, journals, letters, photos and artifacts contain information that you won't find in public records.  Interview your family and record their stories.

2.                  Sort the birth, marriage and death dates and places of each person in your family.  Use family group sheets to gather information about each single family, then use pedigree charts to document more than one generation.  You will find free forms on ancestry.com.

3.                  Document all research as you go.  If information came from Aunt Tilly, make a note of who she is, when and where you interviewed her and what she said.  If the source is a newspaper clipping, document the paper's name, and the date and place of publication.  The source of each piece of information is vital to proving its accuracy.

4.                  Use the U.S. Federal Census (found at ancestry.com) to put together a family timeline.  Taken every 10 years since 1790, the census gives a snapshot of each family living in the U.S. Most censuses will provide basic information about each person in the family.

5.                  Find vital records for each person in the family.  Birth, marriage and death records may provide links from one generation to the next by listing names of parents, birthplaces of fathers and other identifying information.  This is a common record to use when trying to identify the family's location in the old country before they came to the U.S.

6.                  Newspapers can provide more details about births, marriages and deaths as well.  They tell more of a story with details that would not make it into public records.

7.                  Genealogists have published family histories for hundreds of thousands of families.  If someone has researched your family, the Society may have a copy of that family history.

8.                  Immigration records (citizenship papers and passenger lists) can provide insights into the experiences of your immigrant ancestors.

9.                  Military, land, church, cemetery and other records will be easier to locate once you've done the work with the other records listed above.

10.              Take classes to learn more about researching your family history.  The Society's library and archives hold genealogical classes each spring and fall.  For more information visit wisconsinhistory.org/libraryarchives/classes.

Check out the Wisconsin Historical Society website by clicking here.

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HERE ARE SOME FORMS THAT SHOULD BE USEFUL IN YOU RESEARCH

Just click on the blue text to see the forms.  You may also print while viewing.

Family Group Worksheet side 1

Family Group Worksheet side 2

4 Generation Ancestor Chart

Tree Pedigree Chart

The following information is taken from this website: http://www.genealogy.com/16_cousn_print.html

What is a First Cousin, Twice Removed?

If someone walked up to you and said "Howdy, I'm your third cousin, twice removed," would you have any idea what they meant? Most people have a good understanding of basic relationship words such as "mother," "father," "aunt," "uncle," "brother," and "sister." But what about the relationship terms that we don't use in everyday speech? Terms like "second cousin" and "first cousin, once removed"? We don't tend to speak about our relationships in such exact terms ("cousin" seems good enough when you are introducing one person to another), so most of us aren't familiar with what these words mean.

Relationship Terms

Sometimes, especially when working on your family history, it's handy to know how to describe your family relationships more exactly. The definitions below should help you out.

Cousin (a.k.a "first cousin")

Your first cousins are the people in your family who have two of the same grandparents as you. In other words, they are the children of your aunts and uncles.

Second Cousin

Your second cousins are the people in your family who have the same great-grandparents as you., but not the same grandparents.

Third, Fourth, and Fifth Cousins

Your third cousins have the same great-great-grandparents, fourth cousins have the same great-great-great-grandparents, and so on.

Removed

When the word "removed" is used to describe a relationship, it indicates that the two people are from different generations. You and your first cousins are in the same generation (two generations younger than your grandparents), so the word "removed" is not used to describe your relationship.

The words "once removed" mean that there is a difference of one generation. For example, your mother's first cousin is your first cousin, once removed. This is because your mother's first cousin is one generation younger than your grandparents and you are two generations younger than your grandparents. This one-generation difference equals "once removed."

Twice removed means that there is a two-generation difference. You are two generations younger than a first cousin of your grandmother, so you and your grandmother's first cousin are first cousins, twice removed.

Relationship Charts Simplify Everything

Now that you have an idea of what these different words mean, take a look at the chart below. It's called a relationship chart, and it can help you figure out how different people in your family are related. It's much simpler than it looks, just follow the instructions.

Instructions for Using a Relationship Chart

  1. Pick two people in your family and figure out which ancestor they have in common. For example, if you chose yourself and a cousin, you would have a grandparent in common.
  2. Look at the top row of the chart and find the first person's relationship to the common ancestor.
  3. Look at the far left column of the chart and find the second person's relationship to the common ancestor.
  4. Determine where the row and column containing those two relationships meet.

Common
Ancestor

Child

Grandchild

G-grandchild

G-g-grandchild

Child

Sister or Brother

Nephew or Niece

Grand-nephew or niece

G-grand-nephew or niece

Grandchild

Nephew or Niece

First cousin

First cousin, once removed

First cousin, twice removed

G-grandchild

Grand-nephew or niece

First cousin, once removed

Second cousin

Second cousin, once removed

G-g-grandchild

G-grand-nephew or niece

First cousin, twice removed

Second cousin, once removed

Third cousin

 

CLICK BELOW BLUE TEXT TO FIND A PRINTABLE USEFUL COUSIN FINDER FORM

Cousin Finder Form

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BELOW ARE SOME PRINTABLE FORMS TO TAKE ALONG ON RESEARCH TRIPS TO THE COURTHOUSE

Just click on the blue text to see the forms. You may also print while viewing.

Research Log

Genealogy Research Iog

Grantees

Grantors

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  AFTER TRAVELING BY SHIP OUR ANCESTORS ARRIVED IN AMERICA.

BELOW YOU WILL FIND A PRINTBLE MIGRATION MAP OF THE UNITED STATES.

Just click on the blue text to see the forms. You may also print while viewing.

Migration Map

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OTHER USEFUL FORMS & CHARTS

Just click on the blue text to see the forms. You may also print while viewing.

Illness & Disease

Interview Questions

Naturalization Laws Time Line

German Research Handbook

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INTERESTING MAGAZINE ARTICLES

Just click on the blue text to see the articles.  You may also print the article while viewing.

" LESSONS IN GENEALOGY: A NOTE TO BEGINNERS"

"What To Do When Facts Conflict"

 This article explains why every genealogist should check and recheck any information published in family history books, on the internet or given to them by others.  It is so very easy to take every piece of information as fact and later find out how inaccurate the information is.

"If I post my family tree online, can my identity be stolen?"

 Question that appeared in Family Tree Magazine August 2010 on page 18.

"Family Stories"

This article has tips on doing an oral history with a family member.  For more on preserving your family history, visit Thrivent.com/magazine/family.

"Tracing Your Western European Ancestors"

"Cousins Explained"

 This article helps us to make sense of those family relationships such as "great five time", "1st cousin once removed", cluster genealogy and other connections to family members.

"10 Common Genealogy Mistakes"

This is a very good article for anyone who is just starting there genealogy.  There are lots of pointers in how to avoid retracing research done in the past and things to keep in mind for the future.

"Hiring a Professional: Do's and Don'ts"

 If your genealogy has met a "brick wall", you might want to hire a professional genealogist. This article man aid in your search

Making Connections in 5 Steps

Preservation Practices for the Home Archivist

Writing Your Family History in Five Steps

Everyone Has A Story To Tell

cid002f01c8966c0e88a6500200a8c0YOUR7377988829.gifGOOD LUCK IN YOUR RESEARCH!

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